[CLOSED] Susan Feniger’s Street

I loved watching the recent “Street Food Special” episode of “No Reservations”. It brought together my very favorite Anthony Bourdain clips; the scenes when he’s out and about eating “real food” with the locals, and also recapped Tony-visits to Singapore hawker (food) centers. It really made me wish we had something similar here in Los Angeles.

As Bourdain so eloquently stated: “Whereas in America the food court is the nexus of all things generic and awful, in Singapore these open-to-the-street food centers, coffee shops and hawker centers offer a near limitless variety of Malay, Chinese and Indian dishes”.

In a 1991 LA Times piece, my favorite food writer Jonathan Gold wrote: “The closest thing to a hawker center in Los Angeles is, of course, the Grand Central Market downtown… Among the fruit stalls and the poultry stands, there are 10-odd places where a hungry person can get something to eat”. I haven’t been there in years, and look forward to rediscovering the Grand Central Market again soon, but still it’s not exactly what Bourdain calls, “a ONE chef, ONE dish vast food court”.

It’s true that our multicultural city is filled with delicious strip-mall eats, and I personally plan to spend more time searching them out (hint to my foodie pals). But the large food courts I’ve been to (at various local shopping malls) would never be a destination dining trek of sorts. Well, except for “Hotdog-On-A-Stick”. I’m a sucker for any type of food on a stick.

Susan Feniger’s Street Food

When I first read about Chef Feniger’s new restaurant, I envisioned it to be a sort of miniature hawker center. An enclosed space filled with individual street carts from the around the world. In my mind, I even imagined individual cooks (in traditional attire) selling the dishes at these tiny indoor food stalls. I don’t know WHERE I came up with these ideas, but reading Jonathan Gold’s description in LA Weekly certainly added to my fantasy:

Street, MyLastBite.com“Street is a virtual museum of world street food, snacks and savories from every part of Asia — Korean-style mung bean pancakes studded with bits of anise-braised pork belly; hollow, potato-stuffed Indian ping-pong balls called paani puri, moistened with a bit of spicy broth; a juniper-laced salad of roasted beets and crumbled walnuts; even a take on the classic Singaporean breakfast dish of toast with coconut-jam kaya and a runny egg. There are dense dal fritters, a delicious version of the do-it-yourself Thai bundles of roasted coconut, bird chiles, peanuts, tamarind jam and minced lime, among other things, sensibly wrapped in bits of collard instead of the traditional betel leaf.”

So no, Susan Feniger’s Street is not the culinary “It’s A Small World” experience that I fantasized about, but it is a wonderful, exciting (and fun!) restaurant that brings my dream just a little bit closer.

What we ate:

Street, MyLastBite.com
Amuse-Bouche: A very exotic (savory) version of a Rice Crispy Treat! Millet Seed Puffs, with Marshmallow, Fennel, Curry, Coriander,Cumin and Black Currant

Street, MyLastBite.com
Spinach Varenyky: Ukrainian dumplings stuffed with spinach and cheese. Served with sour cream and lemon marmalade

Street, MyLastBite.com
Paani Puri: Chef Susan Feniger first tried these on a street market in Mumbai, India. Filled with potato, chutney, beans and topped with yogurt cilantro

Street, MyLastBite.com
Cuban Stuffed Potato Cake: Filled with spiced beef, raisins, and capers; with tomato mint salsa and poblano crema

Street, MyLastBite.com
Scandinavian Beet and Apple Salad – Slow roasted beets with apple, black currant, watercress, toasted walnut, and millet croutons in a juniper vinaigrette

Street, MyLastBite.com
My FAVORITE bite: Kaya Toast, a uniquely Singapore experience; toasted bread spread thick with coconut jam; served with a soft poached egg drizzled in dark soy and white pepper (link to recipe below!)

Street, MyLastBite.com
Marinated New York Strip Steak, skewered and roasted in the wood oven, served with Wild Mushroom Spaetzle and Rapini with Creamed Onions and Bacon

Street, MyLastBite.com
Top Photo: Vietnamese Corn – wok cooked medley of fresh corn, spring onion with glazed pork belly.
Bottom: Saag paneer with Kokum Dal and Rice Plate – A South Indian spinach dish stewed with homemade paneer cheese, tomato and spices; served with dried plum dal and yogurt rice.

Street, MyLastBite.comSusan Feniger’s Street [CLOSED]
742 N. Highland
Los AngelesCA 90038
(323) 203-0500
Website

Street on Twitter

Dining Date: 5/30/09
with Peter, Julian & Wendy 

Mentioned Above:

More about Singapore Hawker Centers

Kaya Toast Recipe via LA Times

My love for Kaya Toast (on LA Times)

Jonathan Gold’s LA Weekly Street Article

Jonathan Gold’s L.A. Times Food Stall Article

Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations Official Site

“Down on the Street” (Bourdain street food) episode

Grand Central Market

Hotdog on a Stick


Susan Feniger's Street on Urbanspoon

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7 Comments

Filed under Eating Out

7 responses to “[CLOSED] Susan Feniger’s Street

  1. I have wanted to go to ‘Street’ for awhile now, and now I REALLY want to go. The food sounds, and looks, wonderful – and I just have to try the Kaya Toast you rave about. Street food is such a different (and wonderful) level of cuisine – loved reading your well written comments about it. One of these days I’d like to see a hawker center in Singapore too. We love Grand Central market! We’ll go with you.

  2. taking photos during the day = much better photos

  3. I’ll go to the Downtown place with you…
    Wasn’t the biggest fan of Street, but perhaps brunch was less exciting than other times. But, then again, the service was less than good.
    So maybe that’s it…

  4. i really wanna try that rice crispy treat thing

  5. OMG….I’ve heard so many things about Street but after reading your post, I MUST go! Love the range of food that is offered.

  6. jgold

    I can’t believe you found that old thing – there was a big contract dispute in the mid-’90s, and nothing of mine from the Times ever appeared online.

    Anyway, if you want to read more of my writing on Singapore hawker food from those years, I did a piece for one of the first issues of Saveur that pretty much stands up: http://www.saveur.com/article/saveur-travels/Singapore-Street-Food

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