Tag Archives: food bloggers

Truly Humbled & Super Excited!

A great big THANK YOU to Betty Hallock and the L.A. Times!!!

Thank You L.A. Times!

Also, thank you Anne Cusack for photographing me (and the food) so beautifully!

Continue reading article on L.A. Times

Some photos of the PRINT copy (so excited!)

Eating the Jitlada Menu (photos)

20 Comments

Filed under Little Bites

The Scotsman!

So very proud of this article by Peter Ross published in Scotland recently.

Link to full article

Photos of recent visits to Scotland

More articles by Peter Ross

(Many thanks to Jonathan Gold for recommending me to Peter Ross!)

2 Comments

Filed under Little Bites

Guinness Steak Pie

Jamie Oliver’s
Steak, Guinness and Cheese Pie with a Puff Pastry Lid

If you’re searching for a St. Patrick’s Day supper recipe (or a hearty meal to warm your spirits), this is a delicious alternative to the traditional pot of corned beef and cabbage, especially if you’re a “meat pie” lover like me.

Steak & Guinness Pie, MyLastBite.com

The recipe is from Jamie Oliver’s terrific cookbook “Jamie at Home”, which coincides with his show on Food Network. The episode with this recipe is called “Pastry”, in case you haven’t seen it yet.

This dish is now a St. Paddy’s Day tradition in our house, and it’s always a hit with friends and family.

My changes to the original recipe are noted in orange.

Ingredients

Olive oil
3 medium red onions, peeled and chopped
3 cloves of garlic peeled and chopped
1 oz butter plus extra for greasing
Steak & Guinness Pie Photo 2, MyLastBite.com2 carrots peeled and chopped
2 sticks of celery trimmed and chopped
4 field mushrooms peeled and sliced
2 1/2 pound brisket or stewing beef cut in to 1 inch cubes
a few sprigs of rosemary, leaves picked and chopped
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 can of Guinness beer

(Instead I used 2 bottles ofGuinness Draught, 11.2 oz size bottles)
2 heaped tablespoons of flour
7 oz freshly grated cheddar cheese
2 sheets of ready made good quality all butter puff pastry
1 large organic free range egg, beaten

(I also added 1 chopped Jalapeno for heat)

Steak & Guinness Pie Photo 3, MyLastBite.com

Instructions

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
In a large ovenproof pan, heat a glug of olive oil on a low heat. Add the onions and fry them gently for about ten minutes – try not to color them too much.

Turn up the heat add the garlic, butter, carrots, celery, jalapenos and scatter in the mushrooms. Mix everything together before stirring in the beef, rosemary, a pinch of slat and a level teaspoon of pepper.

Steak & Guinness Pie Photo 4, MyLastBite.comFry fast for 3 or 4 minutes, then pour in one bottle of Guinness, stir in the flour and add just enough water to cover. Bring to a simmer, cover the pan with a lid and place in the preheated oven for about one (1) and 1/2 hours.

Remove the pan from the oven and give the stew a stir. Put it back in to the oven and continue to cook it for another hour or until the meat is very tender and the stew is rich dark and thick. (I added another half bottle of Guinness at this point).

Jamie notes: “A perfect pie filling needs to be robust, so if it’s still quite liquidy, place the pan on the hob (stove top) and reduce until the sauce thickens.”

Remove it from the heat and stir in half of the cheese, then season carefully and leave it to cool slightly.

Cut about a third of the pastry from the block. Dust a clean work surface with flour and roll both pieces of pastry out evenly with a floured rolling pin to the thickness of a pound coin.

Butter an appropriately sized pie dish then line with the larger sheet, leaving the edges dangling over the sides.

Tip (pour or spoon) the stew into your pastry lined dish and even it out before sprinkling the remaining cheese over it.

Guinness Steak Pie

Brush the edges of the pastry with a little beaten egg.

Guinness Steak Pie

Cut the other rolled sheet of pastry to fit the top of the pie dish and criss-cross lightly with a sharp knife. Place it over the top of the pie and fold the overhanging pastry on to the pastry lid to make it look nice and rustic.

Brush the top with beaten egg then bake the pie directly on the bottom of the oven for 45 minutes until the pastry is cooked puffed and golden.

Guinness Steak Pie

Serves 4 to 6

Guinness Steak Pie

Jamie Oliver’s Official Website

“Jamie at Home” on Food Network

If you have the U.K. version of the book “Jamie Oliver at Home”, it’s on page 342.

I use this Gram Conversion Calculator

Pepperidge Farm Puff Pastry

Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution

Originally posted Mar 13, 2009

13 Comments

Filed under Recipes

EatingTheMenu.com

In March 2010 I decided I would try 300 dishes on Jitlada Thai Restaurant’s menu. Goal completed March 16, 2013!

My favorites dishes are on the “Spicy Southern Thai” pages and I usually invite friends to join me for lunch. Sometimes I just go alone and work in my “remote office“, but either way the focus is all about the amazing food.

Of course I’ll be taking photos of each plate during my delectable journey. Check for updates here at http://EatingTheMenu.com

Eating the Menu - Jitlada Thai Cuisine
300 Dishes Completed! (updated 3/16/13)

Eating The Menu: Jitlada
(click above for more info on each dish)

3/30/10 I met the cutest couple today, who are WAY ahead of me on this quest. Jan & Ron from Glendale. They’ve tried over 100 dishes and eat at Jitlada every week as well! It was so nice to meet some fellow SUPER Jitlada Fans!!

9/10/10 With the help of friends (Julie, Ed, David & LeAnn), I passed 100 dishes today!  All photos here

More about Jitlada

Thanks Zach for sharing lunch with me!

Below are Completed

It took me twelve visits to the Bazaar, but I eventually ate every one of the 76+ dishes on the original two menus (a personal goal I set for myself). I’m so looking forward to the new spring menu, and will post updated photos here.

Eating the Menu – The Bazaar by José Andrés
Dishes Completed (All on menu, Year 1) - 76

Eating The Menu: Bazaar

More about The Bazaar by José Andrés

More Flickr “Eating the Menu” Groups Coming Soon
Animal
Dining Room
LudoBites
Marche’


In the spirit of “full disclosure”, I just want to note that I manage and update JitladaLA.com but do not receive any compensation from the restaurant. I do it because I love the incredible food so much (and wanted to help promote the restaurant), but mostly because I adore Jazz, Tui and their remarkable family.

18 Comments

Filed under Eating Out, Little Bites

Foodista

Back in May, I attended the International Food Bloggers Conference in Seattle, Washington. It was the first ever conference just for food bloggers, and was organized by the founders of Foodista, Barnaby Dorfman and Sheri Wetherell.

Foodista Blog of the Day, MyLastBite.comFoodista is described as “a collaborative project to build the world’s largest, highest quality cooking encyclopedia”. If you haven’t tried it yet, it’s like “wikipedia for foodies”, and since I’m such a hard core “info junkie” AND food lover, Foodista is definitely one of my favorite online resources.

As a food writer working alone at home most days, Foodista is also an important part of my personal (although virtual) community. I get most of my Foodista updates via Twitter now, where I usually “retweet” and share (recipes or food stories) with my own Twitter followers. Learn more about Foodista (and Twitter) via links below.

When I first read about the International Food Bloggers Conference (IFBC) on Foodista.com, the main thing that caught my eye, was the fact that Gourmet Magazine’s Ruth Reichl was the celebrity guest speaker. Like most food lovers, I’ve read all her books, and was eagerly awaiting (her then) soon-to-be released memoir “Not Becoming My Mother”.

Hmmm… a chance to meet Ruth in real life? Without looking like a stalker? The airfare and hotel costs would probably be worth it, just for this opportunity alone!

The book I was reading at the time was Molly Wizenberg’s “A Homemade Life” (she’s also the author of Orangette.com), so when I saw her name on the weekend roster as well, I thought, “that’s it… I have to attend IFBC!”

But here’s the thing… I HATE conferences. I make fun of conferences. I make fun of people that go to conferences. I especially hated when I was forced to go to them for work. The only thing I probably dislike more than a conference, is a committee. One of my favorite quotes being, “as useless as a committee”. I would think to myself, “why would I want to sit in a room full of women (or men) talking about one subject? Why not just google?”.

Okay, you get it… I’m just not a “conference” type of gal. Or at least I used to NOT be. Foodista’s IFBC changed it all for me. It wasn’t a stuffy, “all women only” (also not for me), large venue type of event. The organizers (Sheri and Barnaby) really put on a thoughtful, relaxing and FUN weekend in Seattle.

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.comThe actual conference was held at the beautiful “Sanctuary at Admiral”, a restored historical building (from 1929), located in West Seattle. It was two stellar days filled with food writers, photographers, technology pros and, of course, lots of FOOD (and wine!). 

A few IFBC topics (that I was most excited about) were: “Food Porn – Food Photography & Styling”, “Blogging As A Career” and “Blog to Book – Getting Your Writing On Paper”. The latter in which Molly Wizenberg was on panel. She was so warm, informative and refreshingly humble. I was already a fan BEFORE meeting her, but I probably elevated myself to “Molly Groupie” afterwards.

One of the sessions that I thought would be boring, “Passionate Purveyors & Producers”, was far from it! I was especially captivated by Karl Kupers of Shepherd’s Grain, when he spoke about the “Find the Farmer” project. It’s a website that traces flour from farm to table. Cool, right?

The IFBC nights were fantastic as well. Friday evening’s welcome party was held in a funky, old building near Safeco Field, home to the Mariners. Lots of wine, food (oh, the fresh oysters!) and more wine!

On Saturday evening, it was all about Ruth Reichl. We all gathered at the Pan Pacific Hotel to hear the legendary writer read from her new book. It was just a wonderful, inspirational gathering, and the highlight of the weekend for me!

My good friend Afaf was my traveling companion for the trip, and we were both so happy to finally meet Charles Thompson, another L.A. based food blogger. It turns out that Charles knew my husband Peter from years back (they both work in movies), so the three of us (Afaf, myself and Charles) quickly bonded during the weekend in Seattle. We had two fabulous dinners out (that I’ll post soon), and we even squeezed in a sneaky, quick getaway to the Seattle Cheese Festival on Sunday morning.

There were so many nice folks at the conference (I can say that “c” word without grimacing now!), and it’s been fantastic keeping in touch with several on a regular basis. Here’s a shout out to a few of my daily Twitter pals that I met at IFBC: @Inuyaki, @PlumpestPeach and Washington’s own @PassionForEating … who just so happened to visit me for a wild night (with her family) in L.A. recently! 

I know for sure I’ll be going to IFBC again, and hopefully we’ll have a large L.A. group attending the next one. It was a treat to get out of my “virtual” community (internet & twitter) and actually spend time with my fellow food lovers in person. It just took a special type of conference, like Foodista, to make me appreciate it!

As you can tell, Foodista isn’t just the “wikipedia of food” for me. They’ve also been a solid support for the growth of my blog. If you’re lucky enough to be named Foodista’s “Blog of the Day”, just sit back, smile and watch your page hits skyrocket!

WOW. MyLastBite in the New York TimesA couple of week’s ago, Foodista co-founder Barnaby Dorfman emailed me and asked if I’d like to be photographed for the New York Times. The article would feature Foodista as well as other web-based recipe sites. Soon after, New York Times reporter Kim Severson called and she interviewed me via the phone. Two days after that, photographer Axel Koester was in my kitchen, taking countless pictures of me making bacon-wrapped breadsticks. 

The article was published yesterday… online and in print, and my husband was so excited he got up early and bought twenty copies for family and friends. I’m framing a copy for the kitchen of course, and am just so grateful to Foodista for even thinking of me! For all your support, kindness, guidance and generosity… THANK YOU!

More Photos from IFBC:

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.com
The Sanctuary at Admiral

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.com
A few of the many wonderful speakers at IFBC!
Top left: Kristy Melville, Molly Wizenberg, Jaden Hair
Top right: Molly Wizenberg, Jaden Hair
Bottom right: Rebekah Denn, Kathleen Flinn, Julie Brosterman 
Bottom left: Kristy Melville, Molly Wizenberg

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.com
Inside the conference

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.com
Welcome cocktail party

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.com
Meeting Ruth 
Reichl

IFBC 2009, MyLastBite.com
The most amazing goodie bag EVER. Thanks Sur la Table & Foodista!

About Foodista

IFBC details

IFBC 2009 Agenda

Foodista (and me!) in the New York Times

Mentioned Above:

A Homemade Life by Molly Wizenberg

Not Becoming My Mother by Ruth Reichl

Orangette

About Twitter

About Wikipedia

Gourmet Magazine

Steamy Kitchen by Jaden Hair

Eat All About It by Rebekah Denn

Shepherd’s Grain

FindTheFarmer.com

Simply Heaven Food by Afaf

100Miles by Charles

Bacon Wrapped Breadsticks!

Kim Severson, New York Times

Photographer, Axel Koester

All my IFBC photos on Flickr

6 Comments

Filed under Food Events (festivals, classes, etc.)

Mozza 2Go!

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.comSince our very first visit to Pizzeria Mozza (Christmas Eve 2006), Peter and I have continuously wished for two things: That Mozza would offer a Pizza-to-go / Delivery service, and that Nancy Silverton would make a pizza with chicken liver, guanciale and burrata. If you love Mozza’s Chicken Liver Bruschetta, then you’d understand how amazing this dream pie could be.

Last Thursday, when I learned (via @Foodwoolf on Twitter) that “Mozza 2Go” was OPEN, I immediately texted my husband and wrote, “DO NOT MAKE PLANS TOMORROW!” 

Peter had Friday off from work, and up to that moment, we had no actual plans for the 3rd of July. I searched online to find an opening time for Mozza 2Go, but the closest thing to actual hours listed (at that time) was an Eater LA article stating that, “the first order accepted at noon and the last order at 11:00 pm”.

Thinking there would be a line around the block (hey, it’s Mozza after all!), I told Peter we should plan on getting there by 10:30 AM. I figured we could order a pie, eat it there and then do some shopping at the Grove afterwards. There’s a Mac Store at the Grove… and Peter was obsessed about getting his new iPhone. All I wanted was to check out the new Mozza 2Go. It was a “win win” situation for sure.

By 10:45 am, the only people visible at Mozza 2Go were locksmiths working on the doors to the Scuola di Pizza (Pizza School) next door. I took several photographs of the exterior and called the Mozza 2Go phone number. The lovely voice on the recording noted that they were open Tuesday through Sunday, and that the phone lines opened at 11:00 am, with the first order availalable at noon. The message also said to check the Mozza2Go.com website for more details, but as of that morning (Friday July 3rd), the site was not yet online (Peter kept checking with his old iPhone).

So, we waited. “Mozza Groupies”, just the two of us. I kept calling the number and got the same recording… over and over again. At 11:30, we (meaning Peter) decided we should drive to the Grove and come back afterwards. My iPhone-obsessed husband traipsed off to the Mac store, while I impatiently shopped at World Market and Sur La Table (both stores are near the parking lot).

At about one o’clock we finally got back in the car (Peter flying high from his 3Gs iPhone purchase), and drove back to Highland and Melrose. The sidewalk was still empty, but Mozza 2Go was finally OPEN! Yes, some wishes do come true!

No crowds yet, just us and another couple waiting to order pizza. For some reason (hunger?) I thought we could order a pizza and have the choice of either eating there or taking it home, but of course it’s called “Mozza 2Go”! After a quick look around (they sell the chicken liver AND the Budino to go!), we decided to try to get a table at Pizzeria Mozza around the corner. Having skipped breakfast, we were both, by then, famished and a little cranky (at least I was, Peter was playing with his shiny new toy). 

During the end of our lunch at Pizzeria Mozza (photos & link below), Peter called Mozza 2GO and ordered a Fennel Sausage Pizza for us to pick up afterwards. We figured we may as well try the 2Go service since we were there, and heck… we never get sick of Mozza!

When we got back to Mozza 2Go, I was curious about the Pizza School next door. “Where do I sign up?” was the first question out of my mouth, but it turns out it’s for private events only, with a max of 45 “students” per class. A press release was recently sent out that noted, “In addition to pizza training the Scuola will be home to a variety of cooking demos, wine tastings and other culinary exploits”. I asked about the cost for a private pizza class (with 44 of my nearest and dearest), but no one had any answers yet. My birthday isn’t until March, so there’s plenty of time for Peter to sort that out.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
 Mozza 2Go Entrance / Awning

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Scuola di Pizza front window (to the left of Mozza 2Go).

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Mozza 2Go Entrance.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Imported goodies for sale.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
That’s Butterscotch Budino on the top right shelf!

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Mozza 2Go Menu.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Butterscotch Budino to GO! Make sure you get the Rosemary Pinenut Cookie with it.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Monini Olive Oil used in the Mozza kitchens. (Nancy participates in this olive oil coop in Italy).

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Counter goodies. (Partial of Nancy Silverton) 

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Peter paying for our treats.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
At the counter.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Scuola di Pizza (Pizza School) next to Mozza 2Go.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Looking from Mozza 2Go into Scuola di Pizza.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Pizza boxes on the shelves at Scuola di Pizza.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Our pizza (Fennel Sausage, Panna, Red Onion $15) outside of Mozza 2Go.

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
I love Nancy’s signature on the pizza box sticker! (Yes, I saved it)

Mozza 2 Go, MyLastBite.com
Fennel Sausage, Panna, Red Onion Mozza 2Go Pizza –
PERFECT 
at home!

Mozza 2Go
Scuola di Pizza

6610 Melrose Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90038
323 297 1130

Website

Hours: 12pm – 11pm
Closed Monday
Free 15 minute parking for take out orders available behind Mozza 2 Go.

Dining date: July 3, 2009

All Mozza 2Go Photos on Flickr

Mentioned above:

Lunch at Pizzeria Mozza

@Foodwoolf

Eater LA

The Grove

World Market

Sur la Table

iPhone

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Filed under Eating Out

Pizzeria Mozza – 7/03/09

Pizzeria Mozza, MyLastBite.comWhile waiting for the new Mozza 2 Go to open last Friday, my husband Peter and I decided to get some lunch at Pizzeria Mozza, which is right around the corner. We’ve never gone to Mozza just for the pizza, although they certainly do make our favorite pies in town.

If you were to ask us separately, what our favorite pizza was at Mozza, there is no doubt we would both say, “Chicken liver and Guanciale”. It doesn’t actually exist, but we pretend like it does by each ordering our own serving of Bruschetta with Chicken Livers, Capers, Parsley & Guanciale (three pieces each). It’s the one dish that Peter and I always crave, so whenever we sit down for a bite at the pizzeria, we treat the chicken liver on bruschetta like the “main course”, then split a pizza “on the side”.

I want to note here that the bread that comes with the chicken liver is beautiful. The bruschetta is warm, crispy and is a sturdy vehicle for the creamy chicken liver. I have no complaints about the bread, but I just think the chicken liver mixture would be stellar on Mozza’s light and airy pizza crust. The dough could be cooked with just a little olive oil in the wood-burning oven, then topped with chicken liver, guanciale and burrata while still warm. 

This brilliant idea of ours hasn’t made it on the menu yet, even though we hint anytime we see Nancy at a food festival or at the restaurant. I was thrilled to learn that Mozza 2 Go will be selling their chicken liver for take-out as well, so you can bet I’ll be having some fun whipping up my dreamy concoction at home!

The pizza (that we shared) on this visit was a luscious Egg, Bacon, Yukon gold Potato & Bermuda Onion Pizza. We also each had a quartino of Bastianich Tocai Friulano wine, and it was a perfect start to the holiday weekend.

Pizzeria Mozza, MyLastBite.com
Bruschette: Chicken Livers, Capers, Parsley & Guanciale

Pizzeria Mozza, MyLastBite.com
Egg, Bacon, Yukon gold Potato & Bermuda Onion Pizza, Photo 1

Pizzeria Mozza, MyLastBite.com
Photo 2

Pizzeria Mozza, MyLastBite.com
Photo 3

Pizzeria Mozza
641 N. Highland Ave. Los Angeles,
California 90036
(323) 297-0101
mozza-la.com

Dining date: July 3, 2009

Mozza 2 Go (my first visit)

Bastianich Tocai Friulano

Mozza 2 Go (website)

About Guanciale

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Chimichurri “Air” – Adventures in Molecular Cooking [7]

After learning the simple recipe for making flavored “air” at Molecular Gastronomy Class, I thought long and hard about what I wanted to aerate first. Multiple visits to the the Bazaar by José Andrés had me familiar with Bar Centro’s “salt air” topped margaritas, and my favorite “new way” martini with spherified (Ferran Adria) olive is topped with a tangy brine “air”. 

Peter and I love grilling flatiron steak, and I make homemade chimichurri sauce at least once a week. But in our house it’s not just for beef. We also add it to eggs, quesadillas, pastas, and even tuna salad.

Chimichurri "Air" photo 10 by MyLastBite.comTo make the “air”, there are actually only two ingredients needed: some sort of liquid and the lecite (aka lecithin), a natural soy-based emulsifier (links below).

Traditional chimichurri is usually made with two liquids: olive oil and acids, usually limes or vinegar. To make my chimichurri air, I left OUT the olive oil and just drizzled the oil on the steak directly, BEFORE adding the “air” on top.

I like my chimichurri REALLY spicy and wasn’t sure the heat would remain after straining and aerating, but it did. The light (and well, airy) texture was a refreshing change from the standard sauce. 

I certainly don’t plan on going crazy with the lecite (although I do think a Heinz 57 “air” would be an awesome return to my childhood). To me, it’s simply about learning yet another delicious (and fun!) cooking technique at home.

My Recipe for Chimichurri Air:

Chimichurri "Air" photo 2 by MyLastBite.com9 oz liquified chimichurri sauce (recipe follows)
1.5 g lecithin (aka lecite), food grade
Olive oil (to drizzle on steak) 

To make the chimichurri sauce:
1 cup chopped parsley
1 cup chopped cilantro
2 medium jalapeno chilies (or more if you like it spicy)
8 oz of fresh lime juice or red wine vinegar
2 or 3 cloves of garlic
Fleur de sel (or sea salt) 

Place all ingredients in a mini-chop or food processor and blend until liquified.

Chimichurri "Air" photo 3 by MyLastBite.comMeasure 9 oz of liquid (add vinegar or water if needed). 

Then pour the liquid through a fine strainer to remove any large pieces.

Make sure it’s 9 oz of liquid to 1.5 g lecithin (again, add vinegar or water if needed).

Place the chimichurri sauce and lecite into a large bowl and blend with a stick-blender until foaming. Note: I have a large, plastic container that I use for this. It can get pretty messy in a standard bowl, so wear an apron!

Chimichurri "Air" photo 9 by MyLastBite.comPrepare the steak:
Grill steak to desired doneness and let meat rest for at least ten minutes.

Cut and plate then drizzle olive oil directly on steak.

Add salt then scoop out whipped “air” from bowl and gently place on meat.

If the “air” becomes watery, simply blend again (not too long) until foamy. Serve immediately!

Chimichurri "Air" photo 11 by MyLastBite.com

Mentioned Above:

Bazaar’s Martini w/ Brine “Air”

About Texturas (in English)

Albert & Ferran Adria Textura site (spanish)

About Texturas – Lecite (airs)

Where to buy molecular ingredients

Molecular fun at home

My ChimiTuna (tuna salad with chimchurri)

My visits to the Bazaar

Ferran Adria’s “Liquid” Olive

El Torito’s Deep-Fried Ice Cream photo

Adventures in Molecular Cooking 6 (Trisol)

Adventures in Molecular Cooking 5 (Class)

Why I call it “Molecular Cooking”

All my chimichurri “air” photos on Flickr

20 Comments

Filed under Molecular Cooking, Recipes

Greek Lemon Chicken

Allergy season in the San Fernando Valley is, by far, my least favorite time of year. It’s now been a month since my spring-time symptoms kicked in, and I’ve been feeling pretty lousy the entire time: Itchy and watery eyes, non-stop sneezing, postnasal drip (with congestion, which I don’t understand), loss of smell, and the worst part, for me, are those dreadful hours when I loose my sense of taste.

I’m currently taking two different prescription medications that definitely help ease the symptoms, but living with three dogs (who sleep in the bed) only adds to the problem. Peter and I will never get rid of our dogs (aka our “kids”), and honestly, most of the time I just feel really grateful that seasonal allergies are my only health issues.

But last week, on top of dealing with my sensitive sinus problems, I came down with a nasty, head cold. I didn’t even know it was a cold for the first few days because I hadn’t had a good night sleep in weeks, and already felt drained and depressed. I tried to shake the blues by drinking extra cups of green tea, reading my current favorite book on the sunny porch out front, and also by taking extra walks with the pups.

When I woke up Thursday morning still feeling gloomy, I suddenly remembered that one thing that was missing from my days. Talking aloud to myself (with my dogs tucked in snugly beside me), I sat up in bed and said, “cook, stupid”.

Because I was suffering from both allergies and a head cold, I hadn’t cooked a proper meal all week. Hot tea and cereal for breakfast, cold meds for lunch and “frozen entrées” for dinner. No wonder I felt like crap. Physically, I wasn’t getting any real nutrition, and I’d forgotten to do the one thing every day that makes my spirits soar.

I then decided to make one of my very favorite, super EASY one pan meals. Greek Lemon Chicken with Roasted Garlic and Potatoes. I first had it when I visited friends in the Greek Islands over twenty years ago, and it’s always a comforting plate of food. And as you can imagine, I felt amazingly better after just one bite.

Greek Lemon Chicken w/ Roasted Garlic and Potatoes

Ingredients:

3 1/2 to 4 pounds of chicken pieces (I prefer thighs and legs) with skin.

3 medium lemons (juiced, but save lemon halves)

3 pounds of baby potatoes (your favorite)

1 tablespoon of oregano

2 to 3 teaspoons of salt (to your liking)

1/2 teaspoon of pepper

2 medium heads of garlic

1/2 cup of olive oil

Greek Lemon Chicken 2, MyLastBite.com
Preparation:

Preheat oven to 350°F

Clean the chicken and potatoes, dry then place in large baking pan.

Cut tops of garlic (be careful) to expose cloves, and set face up in pan.

Next add olive oil, the juice of 2 lemons, then rub over everything.

Make sure there’s a nice coating of oil on the bottom of pan, so the chicken doesn’t stick.

Add oregano, salt and pepper. Coat everything in the pan.

Add the last two lemon halves in pan and let bake with the other ingredients.

Now, turn chicken pieces so the skin in facing down on the pan bottom.

Greek Lemon Chicken 3, MyLastBite.comCook for about 90 minutes total:
After 30 minutes, carefully remove hot pan from oven and gently turn over the chicken pieces so the skin is facing UP. This way you’ll get a nice, crispy and flavorful skin.

At the same time, turn over the potatoes and then place back in oven for 60 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through.

To serve: After the garlic heads have cooled, you can pop out each roasted clove with a knife and serve the sweet, mushy cloves on top of the chicken. Or, do what I did and serve the entire half of the clove itself. They’re delicious smashed into the potatoes or added to warm, crusty bread as well. The extra lemon halves (now soft and baked) can be eaten too. Enjoy.

Greek Lemon Chicken 4, MyLastBite.com

Note: The dish is terrific on it’s own, but it’s even better with a Horiatiki Salata (classic Greek country salad). I didn’t think to get the Greek salad ingredients at the market that day, so I tossed together a side dish with things I had at home: clementines, fresh green beans, and roasted beets.

Mentioned Above:

Horiatiki Salata: Recipe for Greek Country Salad

My Pups

In Greece

Cuties California Clementines

Current favorite book: “A Homemade Life” by Molly Wizenberg

“Cook, Stupid.” written by Jo Stougaard ©MyLastBite.com All Rights Reserved. No usage allowed including copying or sharing without written permission.

Greek Lemon Chicken W/ Roasted Garlic & Potatoes on Foodista

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Sage Potato Chips

I love making crispy fried sage. They’re just great on top of grilled steak or even crumbled on hashed browns. Sometimes I just eat them by themselves like potato chips, simply fried in olive oil and sprinkled with sea salt.

Sage Chips Photo #7 MyLastBite.comSo when I saw a recipe for “Sage Potato Chips” in Saveur Magazine, I knew I’d have to try it out immediately. The original recipe is by Chef Dan Barber of Blue Hill at Stone Barns, and I was totally mesmerized by the accompanying photograph in the magazine. I used the ingredients that I already had in my kitchen, and it was easy and delicious. 

What you need:
Potatoes (I had Russet on hand)
Sage Leaves
Oil
Sea Salt
Paprika 

Step 1: Clean and dry sage and potatoes
Sage Chips Photo 1 MyLastBite.com

Step 2: Using a mandolin, make long slices of the potato
Sage Chips Photo 2 MyLastBite.com

Step 3: Make 2 cuts in the center of the potato to hold the sage leaf
Sage Chips Photo 3 MyLastBite.com

Step 4: Heat up oil to 200 degrees and fry each potato slice (without the sage) for ten seconds each then drain
Sage Chips Photo 4 MyLastBite.com

Step 4: After the potato piece cools down a bit, insert one sage leaf into the center cuts. Note: I had BIG sage leaves in my garden and had to adjust the slits so they fit.
Sage Chips Photo 5 MyLastBite.com

Step 5: Raise the oil in the pan to 350 degrees and fry slices again (with the sage leaves inserted) until golden and crispy
Sage Chips Photo 6 MyLastBite.com

Step 6: Season with sea salt and paprika
Sage Chips Photo 8 MyLastBite.com

Dan Barber’s Original Recipe and Photo Here

Sage Potato ChipsMentioned Above:

Saveur Magazine

Article about Blue Hill at Stone Barns

About Chef Dan Barber

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