Tag Archives: Scottish Food

Fox & Hounds (Scotland)

Fox & Hounds 2010A trip home to Bridge of Weir, Scotland would not be complete without a family meal at nearby Fox and Hounds. It’s not just an old pub (built in 1779) that serves Scottish, comfort food. “The Fox” (as we call it) is also an award-winning brewery.

Photos from our recent lunch:

Fox & Hounds 2011
Steak, Mushroom and Ale Pie

Fox & Hounds 2011
Tucking into the Steak, Mushroom and Ale Pie

Fox & Hounds 2011
Caesar Salad w Charred Chicken

Fox & Hounds 2011
Ale Battered Haddock

Fox & Hounds 2011
Killer Onion Rings

Fox & Hounds 2011
Houston Brewery’s Peter Well on the left and Warlock Stout on the right

Fox & Hounds 2011
The Fox and Hounds
South Street
Houston, Renfrewshire PA6 7EN
Scotland, UK

Phone: (UK) 01505 612448

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More Fox & Hounds Photos on Flickr

Fox & Hounds 2011

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Filed under Eating Out

Home to Scotland

I’ll miss Peter and the dogs, but I’m so excited to get back to Bridge of Weir this week to visit my dad, step-mum and little brother. Not surprisingly, my favorite moments are always in the kitchen with my father, and on this trip we’re going to focus on traditional Scottish recipes.

In Scotland with my dadRumbledethumps is a traditional dish from the Scottish Borders. The main ingredients are potato, cabbage and onion. Similar to Irish colcannon, and English bubble and squeak, it is either served as an accompaniment to a main dish or as a main dish itself.

Cullen Skink is a thick Scottish soup made of smoked Finnan haddie, potatoes and onions. Lacking the traditional ingredient, any other undyed smoked haddock will suffice. This soup is a local speciality, from the town of Cullen in Moray, on the north-east coast of Scotland. The soup is often served as a starter at formal Scottish dinners.

Clapshot is a traditional Scottish dish that originated in Orkney and may be served with haggis, oatcakes, mince, sausages or cold meat. It is created by the combined mashing of potatoes and swede turnips (“neeps and tatties”) with the addition of chives, butter or dripping, salt and pepper; onions in some versions.

Stoved Howtowdie with Drappit Eggs: Boiled chicken with poached egg and spinach.

Chappit Tatties: Mashed Potatoes with little finely shredded onion or chopped chives (optional).

Up Yer Kilt!Skirlie is a traditional Scottish dish. It is eaten on its own, used as a stuffing for a mock-sausage, the mealie pudding, or used as a stuffing for chicken (most commonly) or other fowl. Oatmeal was a staple ingredient of the Scottish diet, it absorbs other flavours and is filling, so it was found in many dishes of Scottish cooking. Skirlie was used to ‘pad’ out a meal in which meat would have been scarce. In the North East it is eaten with mince as well as with chicken. It is still a much loved dish in Scotland today.

Scotch Eggs: A Scotch egg consists of a shelled hard-boiled egg, wrapped in a sausage meat mixture, coated in breadcrumbs, and deep-fried. Scotch eggs are commonly eaten cold, typically with salad.

My dad didn’t have Scotch Eggs on his list, but I’m going to make sure we make a wee batch! Of course I’ll share details and photos upon my return.

Cheers! Jo

 

About Bridge of Weir

“Haggis Hunt” (a bit about my dad)

Food descriptions via Wikipedia

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The Scotsman!

So very proud of this article by Peter Ross published in Scotland recently.

Link to full article

Photos of recent visits to Scotland

More articles by Peter Ross

(Many thanks to Jonathan Gold for recommending me to Peter Ross!)

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Filed under Little Bites