“Trisol” for crispier, less greasy frying! – Adventures in Molecular Cooking [6]

“Trisol” for crispier, less greasy frying!

I first learned about Trisol on the Chadzilla website (link below). It’s one of my favorite “molecular gastronomy” blogs and I’m always inspired by the photos and information they post.

Chadzilla wrote:
“We have been working with incorporating the Adria’s Surpises product Trisol into fried food textures. It’s a wheat starch that can be used in a dry mix with AP flour (70% flour: 30% trisol) or in batters.  The great benefit is that it buys time for the chef if the fried product has to sit a minute.  This could obviously be seen as advantageous during large groups or parties, but the real advantage is the texture which is amazingly crispy.”

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.comMore about Trisol (as noted on La Tienda’s website):
“Trisol : Is a soluble fibre derived from wheat, especially recommended for the preparation of frying batter and tempura, the result being a crunchy, not at all oily, texture. It is also perfect as a substitute for sugar in the preparation of doughs for biscuits. Characteristics: Available in soluble powder form with neutral taste and smell. It keeps tempura crunchy even with the most moist products.”

I immediately purchased the Trisol and when it arrived a few days later, I was surprised to find it came in a bowling bag size tub! The previous Textura products I’d ordered came in cute, little “V8″ juice size cans containing just 100 grams in each. The Trisol tub weighed in at 4 kilos (8.8 pounds)! What a great excuse to have a good old fashioned FRY-UP! All in the name of “research” of course.

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.comTrisol Fry-Up Test #1 – Buttermilk Onion Rings.

Using a simple buttermilk recipe, I incorporated the Trisol:

I sliced the onion rings and placed in a large container.

Poured buttermilk over, covered and placed in fridge for about 1/2 an hour.

Next I prepped two bowls of all-purpose flour then added salt & pepper.

Then I added Trisol to each.

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.comIn one bowl I had 70% flour to 30% Trisol.

In the other bowl I had 50% flour to 50% Trisol (just to see if there was a huge difference after frying).

I mixed them both (separately) then heated up vegetable oil for frying (to 350 degrees).

I then drained the onion rings from the buttermilk, but reserved the buttermilk in a shallow pan so I could coat each piece twice.

1. Take wet (from buttermilk) onion ring
2. Dredge in flour / Trisol
3. Dip in buttermilk a second time
4. Dredge again in flour / Trisol
5. Fry in batches for about 3 minutes or until golden brown.
6. Drain on paper towels and add salt immediately (while still hot).

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.com 
The first batch I fried were the 30% Trisol (as noted on the Chadzilla site). They were still crispy after I left them sitting on the counter for four hours. GREAT for dinner parties!

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.com

The 50% Trisol were lighter in weight and much crispier of course, but they were almost “too crunchy”.

Trisol Fry-Up Test #2 – Asparagus, Tofu Squares and Mozzarella Sticks.

My sister Janet’s kids loved fried foods. They’re not allowed to have them very often though, because my super-healthy sister does NOT. Needless to say, she was less than thrilled when I showed up at her house carrying the tub of Trisol, for “deep-frying research”.

The twins (ages 13) helped me clean and trim some asparagus and then I asked Janet what things we could grab from the fridge. This is when it got fun! After searching through all the drawers, we decided to fry mozzarella sticks, jalapenos and tofu squares (just for my sister).

We marinated each item separately in buttermilk, then got to the fry-up. This time I decided to test 60% flour to 40% Trisol. Following the same instructions as above, we first fried up the asparagus, then jalapenos, tofu squares, and finally the cheese (in case it oozed).

Janet made a huge garden salad and we sat down to our “Deep-Fried-Enjoy-It-Now” (because it will NEVER happen again dinner)! And what did my marathon-running-healthy-eating sister think of the Trisol? She LOVED it. The fact that it wasn’t so greasy made her enjoy it, and we were all shocked to see her reaching for more.

We dipped some bites in ranch dressing, others in ketchup and ate the asparagus on it’s own. I was surprised how much I liked the tofu, since I had cooked it up especially for my sister, but we were fighting over the last, crispy square. The Trisol did a great job holding the tofu wetness inside and I’m definitely going make agedashi tofu soon.

After trying the three Trisol recipes, I liked the 60/40 combination the best. Unfortunately (or fortunately!) I still have half a TUB (four pounds) of Trisol left, and it’s taking up space in my small kitchen. I really don’t deep-fry too often at home, but I guess I’ll have to plan a few more fry-ups in the near future, all in the name of molecular “research” of course!

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.com
The Asparagus

Trisol Fry-Up, MyLastBite.com
Mozzarella Sticks, Tofu Squares, Onion Rings, (jalapeno underneath)

Mentioned above:

Chadzilla

La Tienda

My sister

The kids

Agedashi Tofu

Adria’s Textura Website (in Spanish)

Texturas products I have at home

All my “molecular gastronomy (cooking) at home” photos

Adventures in Molecular Cooking 7 (Chimichurri “Air”)

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19 Comments

Filed under Molecular Cooking, Recipes

19 responses to ““Trisol” for crispier, less greasy frying! – Adventures in Molecular Cooking [6]

  1. What a great find! Thank you for sharing. I am already dreaming of shrimp and calamari cooked this way…

  2. I’m a sucker for fried food. Your pictures look fantastic!!

    This is where food research is worth it’s weight. Finding a solution to problems like residual oils left over in fried products is indispensable. And being able to fry things up, and not rushing to get them to the serving table, has to be a big attraction to people who fry entrees or appetizers for parties.

    Chicken wings. Gotta try the chicken wings.

  3. Mmm, fried food. These are the kinds of science experiments I love.

  4. Jo, this is outstanding!! I just love it.
    I must must try.
    Thank you for sharing!

  5. Nice! I’d love to try that. Funny you put up onion rings because I posted my baked version of onion rings. Actually wedges, but they’re in the same family. LOL.

  6. Joan Nova

    Thanks for the introduction to Trisol. It makes me want to go out and fry something!

  7. This looks fantastic. Now I want to find me some Trisol and fry stuff. This might be great for a chicken and waffles party that I’m planning. :)

  8. You’ve always been an amazing writer and now I feel like your photo taking has hit it’s professional stride. Every shot makes me want to lick my monitor!!! I’m so proud of you xo

  9. cynthia

    Thanks for another great article. I’m just wondering if there is anything ‘negative’ or unhealthy about Trisol? I almost never fry anything but this makes it sound a little less painful.

  10. Lala

    Hi
    Is it healthy?

  11. very cool! thanks for introducing me to this amazing new stuff.

  12. Jai Kohli

    I don’t generally fry foods, but it sounds perfect for fried chicken for picnics! But wow, $124 for 8lbs! If you’re willing to sell a few ounces of yours, let me know ;) Wow, that sounds so elicit…

  13. Very cool, I’ll have to check it out one of these days.

  14. matthew donnelly

    Great information for aspiring or actual chefs

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